Materials

 

ABLESIA is also a brand that is commited to ethical standards and to people who care about Nature and the Environment.

We buy surpluses and deadstocks from local factories in Portugal, thus avoiding fabrics to be needlessly disposed of and ending up in landfills.

Lyoncell, viscose, organic cotton and cupro are some of the fabrics that we use for our garments, materials that are more ecological and Environment friendly. 

 

 

Lyocell 

This is a fiber that is known for is exceptional natural comfort and at the same time is good for the Planet.

It is normally called a semi-synthetic fabric that is compound by wood pulp cellulose and processed with synthetic substances despite all that because is created from plant-based material and it is also referred to as a regenerated fiber.

Compared to the production of other cellulose fibers, lyocell is substantially less toxic and wasteful.

Lyocell is also made in a “closed loop” process and that means that all the chemicals use during production is not discharged into the environment.

Lyocell

Good to know that is:

  • Breathable
  • Durable
  • Absorbs moisture
  • Strong
  • Silky texture gentle for your skin.
  • Anti-bacterial
  • Smooth texture
  • Made from natural fibers
  • It is biodegradable if not mixed with other fibers

 Alerts:

  • Uses a lot of energy for is production.
  • If is mixed with other fibers is not compostable.
  • You could only use cold water no dryer.

Our Lyocell supplier is Troficolor.

To know more about them click here.

 

 

Denim

Denim was first produced in the city of Nîmes in France, and was originally called the serge de Nîmes. The word denim is an English colloquialism of the French term: “de nim.”

Denim is a strong and very resistant fabric made using a twill weave that creates a subtle diagonal ribbing pattern.

The cotton twill fabric is warp-facing, meaning that the weft threads go under two or more warp threads, and the warp yarns are more prominent on the right side.

Denim

Good to know that is:

  • Natural fabric
  • Highly strong
  • Durable
  • Resistant
  • Does not shrink

Alerts:

  • If is made with 100% cotton Denim don’t have a lot of elasticity.
  • Color may bleed into laundry
  • Stretches over time
  • If not organic it is water intensive crop

Our Lyocell supplier is Troficolor.

To know more about them click here.

 

 

Surpluses

Surpluses, deadstock, or leftovers are the common designation for fabrics that are left behind from the producers and due to small damages to the fabric, wrong colour produced or mistake with printing, could be one of the reasons that producers discard tons of fabric per year around the world.

That way the fabric is sitting around for years and years at normally storages and if no one rescues them their end up in land fields.

Surpluses

Good to know that is:

  • Positive environmental contribution, avoiding unnecessary new production of fabric
  • Reduces textile waste
  • Great way to offer an exclusive range of limited-edition pieces

Alerts:

  • Time wasted dealing with damages of the fabrics
  • The fabrics need to be tested to know if shrinks or see their behavior
  • Many times, is not possible to trace the origin of the fabrics

Our Cupro supplier came from surpluses from Portuguese producers located in the north of the country.

 

 

Viscose

Viscose is many times described as an alternative to silk that is created from cellulose, in particular wood pulp from trees such as eucalyptus, pine, or even bamboo. That pulp is dissolved in a chemical solution and be transformed into fibers that will make the viscose fabric.

The important concern that we need to have about viscose is related to the source of the wood pulp and also the process from how everything is turned into the fabric at the end.

The issue is that the pulp should be from renewable wood sources and controlled ways of production.

Has an alternative to the traditional way of producing viscose we choose to acquire from our supplier Rio Pele that has all the eco-responsible standards that the certificate “EcoVero” and “Lenzing” can guarantee.

Viscose

Good to know that is:

Has a silk soft touch and a luxurious look

Is breathable

Holds the color well

Dries quickly

Strong and long-lasting

 

Alerts:

Absorbs moisture, oils, and water and all of them could result in spots

The traditional way of production could be very toxic and harmful to the environment

Wrinkles easily

Shrinks when washed in hot water 

Many times, is not possible to trace the origin of the fabrics

 

Our viscose supplier is Rio Pele.

To know more about them click here.

 

 

Cupro

Cupro is a “regenerated cellulose” fabric that is created from cotton waste.

The process is based on dissolving really small particles of cotton fibers commonly named by linter which are extracted from the cottonseed (that are too small to use in cotton production fabric and normally goes to waste) with a mix of chemicals processed to produce the fabric.

Cupro

Good to know that is:

  • Plant-Based material
  • Vegan
  • It is very soft
  • Produced in a closed loop where chemicals used can be extracted so the water can be used
  • Cooling sensation
  • Biodegradable
  • Low-emission incineration

Alerts:

  • Uses harsh chemicals in the production process
  • More expensive than cotton and other fibers
  • Could not be tumble dried and must be cold washed
  • Wrinkles easily

Our Cupro supplier came from surpluses from Portuguese producers located in the north of the country.

 

 

Cotton

Our cotton came from two places, one from surpluses from Portuguese factories and the other from Rio Pele factory.

The surpluses are difficult to trace but we have the insurance that is produced locally in Portugal.

The Rio Pele factory has a good number of certificates that guarantee both in terms of sustainability and ethical the best standards of production.

Cotton

Good to know that is:

Plant-Based material

Vegan

Breathable

Absorbent

Very resistant

Biodegradable

 

Alerts:

Uses a lot of energy to be produced

Uses pesticides and damage the soil

Uses a lot of water in his production

 

Our cotton supplier is Rio Pele.

To know more about them click here.

 

 

Organic Cotton 

The difference between traditional cotton and organic one has to do with the way that is produced.

Organic cotton is produced and certified to organic agricultural standards and means that the health of soils, ecosystems, and people around them are protected because they use natural procedures rather than toxic ones. Organic cotton production does not allow the use of toxic chemicals or GMOs (genetically modified organisms). The idea behind the organic culture is to use tradition, innovation, and science to promote a good quality of life for the environment and all around it.

Organic Cotton

Good to know that is:

  • Natural
  • Reduces environmental footprint
  • Breathable
  • Absorbent
  • Better for your skin because don’t use toxic chemicals in the production

Alerts:

  • Uses a lot of energy to be produced
  • Still uses a big quantity of water on his production (but less than the tractional cotton)
  • More expensive comparing with traditional cotton

Our organic cotton came from surpluses from Portuguese factories.

 

 

Linen

Linen is probably one of the most used fabrics and it comes from the flax plant. The fibers are extracted from the plan, spun into warn, and at the end woven, turned into fabric.

Recognized to be strong, durable, and absorbent fabric, linen is soft, comfortable and it dries faster than cotton.

The amazing thing about linen is that it needed much less water and pesticides to cultivate, comparing to other fabrics cultivation.

Linen

Good to know that is:

  • Natural and hypoallergenic
  • Thermoregulator
  • One of the most sustainable fabrics that you could use
  • Very strong
  • Absorbent moisture without holding bacteria
  • Easy to cultivate

Alerts:

  • Uses a heavy bleaching process to turn into white color
  • Needs to be washed in cold water and it is best if you dried flat.
  • Wrinkles very easily

Our Linen supplier is RCS, Linhos, S.A.